Lady and the Stamp

y dad was playing alto saxophone in a jazz group last weekend, and while we were there I chatted with some good friends of the family. One of them, Jane, was telling me that a friend of hers, who has some sort of inside track to the man in charge of deciding which postage stamps will be going into circulation, had decried all the upcoming stamps as awful. Katy, my twin sister, then told me some fabulous news: you can make custom stamps. I did not know this. How did I not know this? Why didn’t any of you tell me this??

Don't worry - the only "destination" at our wedding will be Loveburgh, USA

Anyway, I forgive you, because of how awesome this is. How awesome is it, you ask? My answer is: as awesome as an inside-the-park-home-run for the hometown team. As awesome as running your fingers over your eyebrows when they’re soaked with rain. As awesome as a double chocolate mousse cake. As awesome as when the boss sends you home early. As awesome as when you get a package in the mail that you don’t remember ordering, but then when you open it, you realize it’s that book you pre-ordered months ago and now it’s finally here! Yes! Finally!

So: what do you put on a custom stamp? Or better yet, what don’t you put on a custom stamp? A brief scouring of Google Images, one of my most-favorite activities, shows an abundance of dogs, babies, homemade designs/artwork, Jesus stuff, baby announcements, couples getting married, and, of course, two-faced cartoon lions and Canadian seal-whacking.

I guess this is the sort of occasion where, as someone who is planning a wedding, I should probably sit down with my prometida, decide what mailing we might want customized postage stamps for, calculate just how many we would need, figure out how much that would cost, enter it into some sort of spreadsheet, take a “wine break,” maybe watch some TV, and really evaluate whether or not this sounds like a reasonable cost. But that all sounds a little bit too responsible at the moment, so we’ll leave that for another time and instead look at some photos we could use for stamps.

Here’s a nice one of us, for the straightforward approach:

Since doggie stamps are all the rage, here is one of my favorite photos of Jessica, posing with Dumpy, who is the dog of my co-worker Holly that we dog-sat for a few months ago. Dumpy was looking so serious, and so I had Jessica match his facial tone in a photo that says “we are not messing around here:”

Then there’s this one, from a trip to the Russian River with our good friends Mary and Paul, which I like because it’s pretty illustrative of our relationship. One can imagine me saying something hilariously witty and Jessica saying “Breeeeeet!” but you know, in a loving way:

So, you know, those are a few options there. It looks like the going rate is generally around $20 for a book of 20 custom stamps, so a dollar apiece plus some shipping costs. If we send out save the dates to, say, 175 people, that’s probably around $200 just for postage instead of about $50 for postcard-sized cards. Sigh. If I find a stray $200 bill on the ground, then we’re doing custom stamps for sure.

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2 responses to “Lady and the Stamp

  1. I seem to “not get” most of this stuff. (Really? If I put liberty bell stamps on my invitations people will not want to come to my wedding? Wait, there’s a point to the invitation beyond telling people they are invited, so that they will attend?) All that said, I really like this year’s “love” stamps. And I received a wedding invitation the other day and I have no idea what the stamp was. That too.

  2. The dog photo provided a good twenty seconds of laughter.

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